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WebTranslateIt.com is a web-based translation tool to translate documents and software.

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Recent posts

Maintenance window tonight at 9PM GMT

Posted by Edouard on November 23, 2009

A maintenance window is planned tonight for Web Translate It between 9PM to 9.30PM GMT as we are migrating our assets (Javascript and CSS and images) to a proper CDN.

If everything goes according to the plan there should be no downtime and you should only notice a nice speed boost :)

Edit 9.45PM: I am a bit late, but it is done. All Web Translate It’s static content (images, Javascript and CSS) are served by 4 different buckets (or instances of) Amazon S3. This should speed up the loading of these assets and give WTI’s server a bit more overhead to serve actual pages to you.

Web Translate It mini-update

Posted by Edouard on November 18, 2009

I just pushed a very small update to Web Translate It to fix a few user interfaces I had gripes with. Yep, it’s the second update of the day. The differences are quite subtle but I think they make a difference. Read on.

Better Activity Feed

The activity feed show the last activity on your project. It displays the last translations, the last comments and the last files uploaded to the system. The problem is that showing all the translations is sometimes a little bit too much information, which makes the activity feed useless in practice, because you miss the important things.

To fix this issue, the feed about translations are now grouped by author and language.

You can see the hidden translations by clicking on “XX worked a few more strings”. It toggles the rest of the translations the translator has worked on.


On the project page you can now see the comments you haven’t read yet. This is useful if you deactivated the email notifications for Web Translate It in your settings page.

There are also two subtle UI touches on the comment popup. The first one is the “Answer this question” button.

When you click it, it prepares your answer: the drop-down is automatically set to “answer” and the text area gets the focus. Like so:

The second new feature here is the “Mark as answered” button. It basically close the question without answering it. This is useful because sometimes the question has been answered via another medium (email, chat or phone).

Better language switch

There are more language switch throughout the pages and they are better. The old javascript-y toggles have been replaced by a simple drop-down, which are more efficient to use. Often simpler is better.

I hope you will appreciate this (very tiny) update, which should make your commenting experience much better!

Thank you for using Web Translate It.

Web Translate It update

Posted by Edouard on November 18, 2009

These last two weeks have been hectic. Features-wise there is not much new, but a lot of important work has been done.

More supported browsers

Web Translate It now support Internet Explorer 7 and 8. We also support Firefox 3, Safari 3 and 4.

We don’t support and don’t have plans to support Internet Explorer 6. You will have a better experience using Web Translate It with a recent web browser such as Firefox 3 or Safari. We will work on supporting Firefox 2 in the next weeks.

Better comments

The commenting system is much better. You can now notify users from a comment.

This is very useful to ask a question about a string to whom it may concern.

Word counter

One useful feature for translators is the ability to count the number of words in a project. You can now request this data and Web Translate It will send you an e-mail with this information.

Payment system

Finally Web Translate It can accept payments. The payment system use Paypal for now. That was not an easy treat to implement and it took much longer than I expected.

Try Web Translate It

Web Translate It is getting better and better. Have you a website or software to translate, Web Translate It can help to make this task simpler. Check out our plans, they all come with a 1 month free trial.

If you have any questions, please let us know on our support forum or directly by email.

Ruby on Rails plugin for Web Translate It

Posted by Edouard on November 2, 2009

In an effort to make Web Translate It easier to integrate with your application I developed a Ruby on Rails plugin for Web Translate It.

What does it do?

It provides a rake task to fetch your translations

rake trans:fetch

You can also setup the plugin to “autofetch” your translations, the plugin will look for and fetch new translations for every page loaded on your site. This means a translator can translate a string on Web Translate It, reload a page on your website and see instantly the translation she made in context.

How do I get and install it?

Please refer to the documentation on github.

For more help with regards to Web Translate It integration, please have a look at the integration help section on Web Translate It.

Which other web frameworks will you support?

I plan to create plugins for the popular frameworks Django and Cake PHP.

I hope you will find this plugin useful. Should you notice any issue or have a feature request for this plugin, please open an issue on Github’s issue tracking system.

Web Translate It Update: Better File Manager

Posted by Edouard on October 29, 2009

I just rolled out an update to Web Translate It. The update fixes a couple of bugs with the plural forms, and better the File Manager and the importers.

What’s new in the File Manager?

Your list of files is now easier to use. On the File Manager home page you will see a list of Master language file, that is, the files in the language you want to translate from.

If you click on “View Translations”, you will see the target files, that is, the language files you want to translate to.

On this page, you can now rename the files. This is useful to map your Web Translate It projects to your project’s language file architecture. For example, some projects are organised this way:

o locales
  o en
    - locale.po
    - another_file.po
  o fr
    - locale.po
    - another_file.po

Now you can name your English file “en/locale.po” or your French file “fr/locale.po”. Web Translate It is clever enough to recognise you need subdirectories to organise your files and will create it for you when you download your project in a zip file.

The last improvement is support for language file headers. If you import a language file that contains some copyright or important information, Web Translate It will save it and will export your language files with that header.

You can as well edit the headers in Web Translate It’s interface, like so:

I hope this new addition helps you manage your files better in Web Translate It!