🔁


Historial

  1. <h3>Deuterocanonical Books</h3><p>This group of books is known by two names. Catholics call them "Deuterocanonicals," a Greek term which means "second list." The name refers to the list of books that were included in the ancient Greek translation of the Old Testament (Septuagint) but that were not found in the Hebrew Old Testament. The Eastern churches also accept some or all of the books.</p><p>Protestants more often use the term "Apocrypha," which originally meant "secret" or "to be read only in private." Protestants do not accept these books as part of the Old Testament, but they do believe that they are special and are good for Christians to read because they make possible a clearer understanding of the historical and cultural situation in which Jesus lived and taught.</p>
    <h3>Deuterocanonical Books</h3><p>This group of books is known by two names. Catholics call them "Deuterocanonicals," a Greek term which means "second list." The name refers to the list of books that were included in the ancient Greek translation of the Old Testament (Septuagint) but that were not found in the Hebrew Old Testament. The Eastern churches also accept some or all of the books.</p><p>Protestants more often use the term "Apocrypha," which originally meant "secret" or "to be read only in private." Protestants do not accept these books as part of the Old Testament, but they do believe that they are special and are good for Christians to read because they make possible a clearer understanding of the historical and cultural situation in which Jesus lived and taught.</p>

    <h3>Deuterocanonical Books</h3><p>This group of books is known by two names. Catholics call them "Deuterocanonicals," a Greek term which means "second list." The name refers to the list of books that were included in the ancient Greek translation of the Old Testament (Septuagint) but that were not found in the Hebrew Old Testament. The Eastern churches also accept some or all of the books.</p><p>Protestants more often use the term "Apocrypha," which originally  meant "secret" or "to be read only in private." Protestants do not accept these books as part of the Old Testament, but they do believe that they are special and are good for Christians to read because they make possible a clearer understanding of the historical and cultural situation in which Jesus lived and taught.</p>

    cambiado por Bryce .
    Copy to clipboard
  2. <h3>Deuterocanonical Books</h3><p>This group of books is known by two names. Catholics call them "Deuterocanonicals," a Greek term which means "second list." The name refers to the list of books that were included in the ancient Greek translation of the Old Testament (Septuagint) but that were not found in the Hebrew Old Testament. The Eastern churches also accept some or all of the books.</p><p>Protestants more often use the term "Apocrypha," which originally meant "secret" or "to be read only in private." Protestants do not accept these books as part of the Old Testament, but they do believe that they are special and are good for Christians to read because they make possible a clearer understanding of the historical and cultural situation in which Jesus lived and taught.</p>
    <h3>Deuterocanonical Books</h3><p>This group of books is known by two names. Catholics call them "Deuterocanonicals," a Greek term which means "second list." The name refers to the list of books that were included in the ancient Greek translation of the Old Testament (Septuagint) but that were not found in the Hebrew Old Testament. The Eastern churches also accept some or all of the books.</p><p>Protestants more often use the term "Apocrypha," which originally  meant "secret" or "to be read only in private." Protestants do not accept these books as part of the Old Testament, but they do believe that they are special and are good for Christians to read because they make possible a clearer understanding of the historical and cultural situation in which Jesus lived and taught.</p>
    cambiado por Bryce .
    Copy to clipboard
  3. <h3>Deuterocanonical Books</h3><p>This group of books is known by two names. Catholics call them "Deuterocanonicals," a Greek term which means "second list." The name refers to the list of books that were included in the ancient Greek translation of the Old Testament (Septuagint) but that were not found in the Hebrew Old Testament. The Eastern churches also accept some or all of the books.</p><p>Protestants more often use the term "Apocrypha," which originally meant "secret" or "to be read only in private." Protestants do not accept these books as part of the Old Testament, but they do believe that they are special and are good for Christians to read because they make possible a clearer understanding of the historical and cultural situation in which Jesus lived and taught.</p>
    <h3>Deuterocanonical Books</h3><p>This group of books is known by two names. Catholics call them "Deuterocanonicals," a Greek term which means "second list." The name refers to the list of books that were included in the ancient Greek translation of the Old Testament (Septuagint) but that were not found in the Hebrew Old Testament. The Eastern churches also accept some or all of the books.</p><p>Protestants more often use the term "Apocrypha," which originally meant "secret" or "to be read only in private." Protestants do not accept these books as part of the Old Testament, but they do believe that they are special and are good for Christians to read because they make possible a clearer understanding of the historical and cultural situation in which Jesus lived and taught.</p>

    <h3>Deuterocanonical Books</h3><p>This group of books is known by two names. Catholics call them "Deuterocanonicals," a Greek term which means "second list." The name refers to the list of books that were included in the ancient Greek translation of the Old Testament (Septuagint) but that were not found in the Hebrew Old Testament. The Eastern churches also accept some or all of the books.</p><p>Protestants more often use the term "Apocrypha," which originally  meant "secret" or "to be read only in private." Protestants do not accept these books as part of the Old Testament, but they do believe that they are special and are good for Christians to read because they make possible a clearer understanding of the historical and cultural situation in which Jesus lived and taught.</p>

    cambiado por Marissa Watson .
    Copy to clipboard
  4.  
    cambiado por Marissa Watson .
    Copy to clipboard