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WebTranslateIt.com is a web-based translation tool to translate documents and software.

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Update to WebTranslateIt’s search engine

Posted by Estelle on September 22, 2017

We just released an update to WebTranslateIt’s search engine.

The first thing you will notice is that the “Ignore Case” checkbox is now checked by default. It was previously off by default, mainly because case sensitivity only applied to regex searches.

It means that you can now run a basic search with case sensitivity turned on or off. This allows you to search for things more precisely.

Case sensitive results:

Case insensitive results:

We also changed how searching for Source or Target text works. It now searches for stand-alone words.

Here’s an example. On this project we have many segments containing air:

Now by default, searching for air on the source text will only list text containing the word air like MacBook Air, a fresh breath of air. Previously it would had also matched words containing air like Go to the repair shop.

If you’d like to use the old behavior and search for everything containing air then just tick the “regex search” box.

We really think that the new defaults will make searching for segments easier, while by using advanced options lets you search even more precisely. We hope you will like it. Thank you for using WebTranslateIt.

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New in WebTranslateIt: Improvements to PHP Laravel and JSON files support

Posted by Estelle on September 19, 2017

We released an update to the language file handler on WebTranslateIt. We improved the Laravel file handler and the JSON file handler. Other improvements will come along the way.

Support for short-hand arrays in PHP Laravel files

WebTranslateIt now supports short-hand arrays in PHP Laravel files.

Instead of uploading PHP Laravel files containing arrays defined like this:

<?php
return array(
  'foo' => array(
    'subject' => 'Test'
  ),
  'bar' => array(
    'subject' => 'Test 2'
  )
);

You can now upload and download language files looking like that:

<?php
return [
  'foo' => [
    'subject' => 'Test'
  ],
  'bar' => [
    'subject' => 'Test 2'
  ]
];

Custom indentation for JSON files

WebTranslateIt indents all the language files with spaces 😂 but we believe that it is a matter of taste and we shouldn’t impose our spaces indentation. It also makes huge diffs when you download back your language files to version control.

Starting today when uploading a JSON file it detects which kind of indentation you are using (2 spaces, 4 spaces, 1 tab, 2 tabs) and it saves this information to database. When generating your JSON language file we will put your original indentation back on.

More importantly, we laid the ground work for having this feature working for all files handlers. We’ll add custom indentation support for all the other file formats soon.


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Have you heard about the JavaScript XMPP Client?

Posted by Estelle on September 18, 2017

WebTranslateIt has always had a policy of offering free subscriptions to non profit organizations so that they can translate their projects. Over the years, we’ve been joined by people giving life to some very interesting open source projects, like the JavaScript XMPP Client.

We asked Klaus Herberth, lead developer of JSXC to tell us more about it.

WTI: Can you tell us exactly what the JavaScript XMPP Client is?
K.H.: The JavaScript XMPP Client (JSXC) aims to expand every web application by a real-time communication center with end-to-end encrypted two-party chat, video calls, file transfer, group chat and a lot more. Beside some already adapted packages for Nextcloud, Ilias, Wordpress, SOGo and other open source projects, you can easily integrate JSXC with just a few lines of code into your website.

WTI: Who are the people who started it?
K.H.: I started JSXC as part of my Bachelor Thesis and now it’s developed by me, some colleagues from the Distributed Systems Laboratory at the University of Konstanz, Germany and a growing community.

Meet the JSXC core team.

WTI: What was your main motivation?
K.H.: The idea was to create a simple to use, secure and privacy-aware chat application which can be integrated into every website, so that people around the world can share their ideas and opinions without fear.

WTI: Why create a free product when it could have been commercialized?
K.H.: We love open source software and think thats the only way to go if you like to have a secure product. Nobody can trust in closed source software, because you don’t know what’s going on in that black box.

WTI: And finally, can you tell us how WebTranslateIt helped you along the way?
K.H.: It helped us to engage non-technical persons to the project, who like to contribute but need an easy to use interface with a clear work flow.

Klaus and his team have started translating their project into more than 20 languages and we are proud to help them reach to worldwide users.
If you are interested in the JavaScript XMPP Client, want to use it or would like to help develop it or translate it, don’t hesitate to reach out to Klaus at klaus@jsxc.org.

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WebTranslateIt has reached carbon neutrality

Posted by Estelle on September 11, 2017

We believe it is now impossible to deny global warming and the fact that we are all responsible for it, this is why we have decided to offset our carbon footprint.
We first had to calculate it, which was not easy because many websites claim to give accurate results. The best carbon footprint calculator we found was CarbonFootprint.com. The list of questions they ask is very thorough but it is still easy to answer all of them as long as you have access to your company’s expenses.

To our surprise, we discovered that the biggest impact didn’t come from our travels, electricity or water consumption but from the manufactured goods we are buying, especially high-tech ones: laptops, phones. We work remotely, so we don’t have to commute, and our servers are hosted in an already carbon-neutral datacenter in the Netherlands (Leaseweb’s amazing AMS-01).

We looked for solutions to compensate our carbon footprint for the past year and fortunately there are quite a few non-profit organizations that will offer you to participate to projects helping develop sustainable energies all over the world, especially in developing countries, or even just initiatives as simple as reforestation.

We decided to get involved with the Fondation Goodplanet which was created by the photographer and environmentalist Yann Arthus-Bertrand.

We are now really proud to announce that WebTranslateit is

We will keep making daily efforts to change our consuming habits and will collaborate further with the Fondation Goodplanet. Join us in the fight, we believe climate change is not a fatality.

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New in WebTranslateIt: HTML validations

Posted by Edouard on August 10, 2017

We released an update to the translation validator so that it now inspects and detects eventual problems in the HTML code in the translations.

If some HTML code of a translation is missing or differs from the HTML code of the source text a warning message will be displayed. This will help increase the quality of the translator’s translations.

Here’s an example of when a translation’s HTML tag is missing or is completely different:

And when a translation HTML code is not properly balanced.

We also added new validation code to check the number of line breaks is identical in the source and target text:

As usual, validation warning messages are just warnings. You can always click on “Skip Validation” to save your translation anyway.

We hope you will find these improvements useful. Thank you for using WebTranslateIt.

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